• Malvern Madondo

    Malvern Madondo

    Senior
    Harare, Zimbabwe
    Mathematics & Computer Science

    Malvern's Bio:
    I have heard that the average human being uses 10% of their brain's potential. Whether that's true or not, this blog is a mirror of at least part of my brain's functionality and activity. It is an outlet through which I share my experiences and escapades here at CSS. I hope that in between the mixed metaphors and rambling in my posts, you find something valuable. I have an overwhelming interest learning new things and expanding my horizons (which is why I am here). Wait, I just lost my train of thought... Welcome to my 'Pensieve' ~ thinking out loud..

  • Yael Ikoba-Ndjip

    Senior
    Brussels, Belgium
    Accounting Major; Finance minor

    Bryan Chavez

    Junior
    Richfield, MN
    Accounting and Finance

    Brooke Elvehjem

    Junior
    Mora, MN
    Biology

    Takudzwa Munjanja

    Senior
    Gweru, Zimbabwe
    Health Information Management, CIS minor

  • Halle Nystrom

    Graduate Student
    Fargo, ND
    M.S. Health Information Management

    Shivani Singh

    Junior
    Mumbai, India
    Management & Marketing

    Malvern Madondo

    Senior
    Harare, Zimbabwe
    Mathematics & Computer Science

    Neena Koslowski

    Junior
    Apple Valley, MN
    Management

  • Conrado Eiroa Solans

    Senior
    Madrid, Spain
    Psychology Major, Biology minor

    Laila Zemar

    Sophomore
    Casablanca, Morocco
    Biochemistry, Biology and Pre-med

    Jason Chavez

    Senior
    Minneapolis, MN
    Psychology, Organizational Behavior, and Social Work

    Katelyn Gehling

    Junior
    East Bethel, MN
    Exercise Physiology for Pre-Physical Therapy

  • Daniela Moreno Gomez

    Senior
    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Computer Information Systems and Finance

    Jin Baek

    Senior
    Aurora, CO
    Biology and Chemistry (Pre-Med)

    Kathryn McCarrick

    Sophomore
    Saint Paul, MN
    Elementary Education

    Shauney Moen

    Graduate Student
    Oak Grove, MN
    Doctorate of Physical Therapy

  • Laura Salazar

    Senior
    Bogotá, Colombia
    Marketing and Business Management

Embracing Diversity (Abrazando la diversidad)

I was watching a COPA America soccer match last night where Argentina was playing against Chile. I noticed a phrase on the sideboards of the pitch. It simply stated:

Embrace Diversity

After the game and hours later, this morning, I thought about my comprehension of diversity and how it intersects with my life.

Mis amigos

Mis amigos

Students at the College of St. Scholastica, aka CSS, hail from different and diverse backgrounds. And that’s unique because diverse is beautiful. There is a beauty that comes from having different people with different mindsets, experiences, thoughts, beliefs, you name it. We have students from Colombia, China, Tanzania, St. Vincent, Canada, Slovakia, Poland, Ghana, Ireland, England, Zambia, Mexico, Honduras, Zimbabwe and other countries from across the globe. I have friends at CSS who were homeschooled or attended public schools, some private, charter, international and magnet schools. I have friends who like me, are first generation students. Some come from families where their parents, grandparents, siblings or relatives, or close family friends attended CSS. The diversity at CSS is limitless and the more I try to look at how diverse the student body is, the more I discover other ways in which each student adds a unique color to the fabric.

Some students are musicians, movie producers and talented actors. Others make the headlines in sport, art, literature, science, business, and in several other professions that make up CSS. So, when all these talented authors, movie icons, accomplished athletes, academics all come together to a small school on top of a hill and almost on the shores of a titanic lake, circumstances will pave way to an elite education that is more than a sum of its parts.

So, if you are reading this post, embrace diversity wherever you are because you are part of it and you are just as important as all the other parts that make up a diverse population or culture. If you are coming to CSS as a new, transfer, or returning student, make the most of the diversity that you will come across in the classroom, in the dining, the Church, the playing field, in the hallways, far and wide. Diversity.

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