• Malvern Madondo

    Malvern Madondo

    Senior
    Harare, Zimbabwe
    Mathematics & Computer Science

    Malvern's Bio:
    I have heard that the average human being uses 10% of their brain's potential. Whether that's true or not, this blog is a mirror of at least part of my brain's functionality and activity. It is an outlet through which I share my experiences and escapades here at CSS. I hope that in between the mixed metaphors and rambling in my posts, you find something valuable. I have an overwhelming interest learning new things and expanding my horizons (which is why I am here). Wait, I just lost my train of thought... Welcome to my 'Pensieve' ~ thinking out loud..

  • Yael Ikoba-Ndjip

    Senior
    Brussels, Belgium
    Accounting Major; Finance minor

    Brooke Elvehjem

    Junior
    Mora, MN
    Biology

    Laila Zemar

    Sophomore
    Casablanca, Morocco
    Biochemistry, Biology and Pre-med

    Malvern Madondo

    Senior
    Harare, Zimbabwe
    Mathematics & Computer Science

  • Shauney Moen

    Graduate Student
    Oak Grove, MN
    Doctorate of Physical Therapy

    Kathryn McCarrick

    Sophomore
    Saint Paul, MN
    Elementary Education

    Jin Baek

    Senior
    Aurora, CO
    Biology and Chemistry (Pre-Med)

    Daniela Moreno Gomez

    Senior
    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Computer Information Systems and Finance

  • Bryan Chavez

    Junior
    Richfield, MN
    Accounting and Finance

    Katelyn Gehling

    Junior
    East Bethel, MN
    Exercise Physiology for Pre-Physical Therapy

    Halle Nystrom

    Graduate Student
    Fargo, ND
    M.S. Health Information Management

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    Junior
    Apple Valley, MN
    Management

  • Takudzwa Munjanja

    Senior
    Gweru, Zimbabwe
    Health Information Management, CIS minor

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    Senior
    Minneapolis, MN
    Psychology, Organizational Behavior, and Social Work

    Laura Salazar

    Senior
    Bogotá, Colombia
    Marketing and Business Management

    Conrado Eiroa Solans

    Senior
    Madrid, Spain
    Psychology Major, Biology minor

  • Shivani Singh

    Junior
    Mumbai, India
    Management & Marketing

Classroom Culture 101: Just Do It!

Have you ever heard of the Harkness Method? If not, do not worry  my friend Wikipedia has got your back!

The Harkness table, Harkness method, or Harkness discussion is a teaching and learning method involving students seated in a large, oval shape to discuss ideas in an encouraging, open-minded environment with only occasional or minimal teacher intervention.

My former high school(s) encouraged more of a ‘Speak when you have something to say – not when you have to say something’ attitude where students were expected to speak (hopefully) when they had something to say. However, students could raise their hands to draw attention if necessary or just spit out whatever question they had – in a respectful and polite manner of course. Now in college, CSS to be particular, its quite different – depends with the instructor really. Most of my college classes have been, fortunately and unfortunately, lecture based and with a few occasions of open discussion. I often find myself hesitant to raise my hand. I sometimes actually take more time debating whether to raise my hand or not than I take to think about the question I am responding to.

Often, I notice a few classmates with the same issue – they want to participate so much but the first step of raising their hand or speaking out freaks them out so much that you can almost see them sink in their desks. Shia LaBeouf made a great motivational video called ‘Just Do It’ and you can watch it here. I find that this is the most effective way when in doubt – just do it, even when you think your question or answer is not relevant or is off topic or ‘silly’. Once you do this a number of times, your confidence levels will be off the ground and you will actually start to enjoy class more. I often use this learning technique in my not-so-easy classes i.e. the ones that kinda threaten to distort your logic.

So, instead of keeping to yourself, be more active in class and your energy is most likely to rub onto other students and the whole class might catch fire and the instructor will have to stay up longer to prepare for class because the students are just on top of the game!

Just do it!

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