• Amanda Vanderbeek

    Amanda Vanderbeek

    Class of 2012
    Ely, MN
    Elementary education

    Amanda's Bio:
    I grew up in the Twin Cities, but now live up in Ely, MN near the BWCA, where my family has been for the last 7 years. I have three brothers, who I adore, and I enjoy fishing, playing basketball, and rough housing with them whenever I can. My mom has been a daycare provider since I was born, which served as inspiration for me to pursue a degree in Elementary education. I also love to paint, draw, and DANCE! I have been dancing for twenty years and am a dance instructor in Superior, WI....I can't imagine a life without it!

  • Neena Koslowski

    Junior
    Apple Valley, MN
    Management

    Yael Ikoba-Ndjip

    Senior
    Brussels, Belgium
    Accounting Major; Finance minor

    Shivani Singh

    Junior
    Mumbai, India
    Management & Marketing

    Laura Salazar

    Senior
    Bogotá, Colombia
    Marketing and Business Management

  • Jason Chavez

    Senior
    Minneapolis, MN
    Psychology, Organizational Behavior, and Social Work

    Daniela Moreno Gomez

    Senior
    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Computer Information Systems and Finance

    Jin Baek

    Senior
    Aurora, CO
    Biology and Chemistry (Pre-Med)

    Halle Nystrom

    Graduate Student
    Fargo, ND
    M.S. Health Information Management

  • Katelyn Gehling

    Junior
    East Bethel, MN
    Exercise Physiology for Pre-Physical Therapy

    Bryan Chavez

    Junior
    Richfield, MN
    Accounting and Finance

    Conrado Eiroa Solans

    Senior
    Madrid, Spain
    Psychology Major, Biology minor

    Takudzwa Munjanja

    Senior
    Gweru, Zimbabwe
    Health Information Management, CIS minor

  • Shauney Moen

    Graduate Student
    Oak Grove, MN
    Doctorate of Physical Therapy

    Kathryn McCarrick

    Sophomore
    Saint Paul, MN
    Elementary Education

    Brooke Elvehjem

    Junior
    Mora, MN
    Biology

    Laila Zemar

    Sophomore
    Casablanca, Morocco
    Biochemistry, Biology and Pre-med

  • Malvern Madondo

    Senior
    Harare, Zimbabwe
    Mathematics & Computer Science

Sleeping: Myths and Facts

Every individual on the planet needs to get sleep.  You, my college friend, are not invincible and are no exception to this rule!  With finals around the corner, it is more important than ever to be catching Zs each and every night.  However, there are many misconceptions about sleeping, how much we need, and what techniques help to speed up the sleeping process.  Here are some of these myths and facts: REVEALED.

1. Eight hours of sleep is the ideal amount for all individuals.  The truth: MYTH.  This magical number “8” serves as merely an average, and each individual requires different amounts of sleep.  For some, this is 7-9 hours, but for many others it is 4-6 or even 10-12.

2. As we get older, we need less hours of sleep a night.  The truth: MYTH.  While it is true that adults tend to get less sleep as they get older (due to work, having children, responsibilities, etc), this does not mean that their bodies do not benefit from greater amounts of sleep.  They enjoy getting their rest just as much as you and I!

3. Naps can help you to catch up on sleep.  The truth: FACT.  However, the length of the nap and when it occurs can play a pivotal role in helping sleepy people.  Power naps that last around 15-20 minutes are usually ideal and lead to a refreshed state of mind.  However, naps that extend an hour or more can sometimes play the reverse effect, making a person even more groggy.

4. You can always catch up on sleep during the weekends.  The truth: FACT.  As long as you are staying on a semi-regular schedule over the weekend (going to sleep at around the same time you do during the week) and just waking up one or two hours later, you catch up on sleep and maintain a regular sleep pattern.  So party responsibly 🙂

5. Eating before bed will make you fat.  The truth: MYTH.  While many individuals claim that eating snacks or meals before falling asleep increases the risk of fat deposits in the body, your body actually will process food in the same way whether awake or asleep.  It may not be as good for you, however, in the nutritional aspect (because nutrition decisions before bed tend to be more impulsive).

6. Exercising before bed can help you to sleep.  The truth: VARIES.  This my friends is a situational truth.  For some people, exercising can help to let out any stress or concerns that have accumulated over the course of the day and channel it into a healthy before-bed release.  However, because exercise triggers endorphins which can speed up energy and metabolism, this can lead others to become more energetic and alert (which is obviously not ideal for sleeping).  Know yourself, and know what helps you personally.

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