• Malvern Madondo

    Malvern Madondo

    Junior
    Harare, Zimbabwe
    Mathematics & Computer Science

    Malvern's Bio:
    I have heard that the average human being uses 10% of their brain's potential. Whether that's true or not, this blog is a mirror of at least part of my brain's functionality and activity. It is an outlet through which I share my experiences and escapades here at CSS. I hope that in between the mixed metaphors and rambling in my posts, you find something valuable. I have an overwhelming interest learning new things and expanding my horizons (which is why I am here). Wait, I just lost my train of thought... Welcome to my 'Pensieve' ~ thinking out loud..

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    Mathematics & Computer Science

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What’s it like being a double major? – Part 1

Like most things in life, double majoring in college has its merits and demerits. Because of this, many often wonder how students with two majors manage their life and time in college and how they survive or benefit from doing so. I will start with the demerits… saving the good for last haha

 

First, a background:

At CSS, I double major in Mathematics and Computer Science (or Computer Information Systems if you will). I recommend you read this article published on The Sentinel Blog exploring the differences and similarities between Computer Science and Computer Information Systems. Here’s an excerpt:

The College of St. Scholastica offers Computer Science students the ability to choose from four concentrations around which to focus their studies:

  • Business analysis
  • Health informatics
  • Mathematics
  • Software engineering

This allows students to build a solid foundation of computer science fundamentals while also giving them the flexibility to branch out into specializations that best fit their interests and career goals. 

I am a dyed-in-the-wool fan of Math and I was certain that whatever I ended up studying in college would involve mathematics. For CS, it was my belief in the transformative power of technology that led me to decide to focus on this subject area, in addition to Math.

Now the demerits…

One of the drawbacks of double majoring is that one often finds that they have less time to explore the other fields they’re passionate about. I love studying history, theology, philosophy, and psychology, among other hardcore humaties subjects. At most, I will take one Religion class and that might not be as close to Theological studies as I would want to get into. In addition, if one double majors in distinct subjects that do not have any classes in common, the academic load becomes more than one can handle and this often is the root cause of stress especially during exam time.

To add to, double majoring in subjects that have large amounts of coursework can lead to mental exhaustion and deprives one time to get involved in other college activities. Many a time, I start my day early in the morning and finish late at night, leaving me with less time to connect with friends and get involved in sports (I like volleyball and soccer).

These are some of the few demerits of double majoring that I have personally encountered. If you are looking to double major at CSS, do not lose heart. The merits surpass these and I will write about them in a separate post because, well they need the full attention and I have to do some work now… (Bloggers who double major often have less time to compile lengthy posts lol – my excuse)

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