• Cheyenne Lemm

    Cheyenne Lemm

    Senior
    Cromwell, MN
    History and Social Science Secondary Education

    Cheyenne's Bio:
    Hello hello, my name is Chey! I fully admit that I am an over achiever and a slacker simultaneously. I am really involved in social justice on campus, especially the Indigenous Student Alliance. I love cats and science fiction. I come from a big family so community and connections are important to me.

  • Tayler Boelk

    Class of 2017
    Duluth, MN
    English

    Shauney Moen

    Graduate Student
    Oak Grove, MN
    Doctorate of Physical Therapy

    Bryan Chavez

    Junior
    Richfield, MN
    Accounting and Finance

    Courtney Stempinski

    Class of 2017, Graduate Student
    Cambridge, MN
    Master of Education

  • Jason Chavez

    Senior
    Minneapolis, MN
    Psychology, Organizational Behavior, and Social Work

    Victoria Tabolich

    Sophomore
    Cambridge, MN
    Exercise Physiology

    Cheyenne Lemm

    Senior
    Cromwell, MN
    History and Social Science Secondary Education

    Alexa Lee

    Class of 2017
    Esko, MN
    English

  • Jesse Heaton

    Graduate Student
    Heyworth, IL
    Doctor of Physical Therapy

    Emily Nelson

    Class of 2017
    Rochester, MN
    Communications

    Marisa Hutterer

    Class of 2017
    Prior Lake, MN
    Social Work

    Brooke Elvehjem

    Junior
    Mora, MN
    Biology

  • Malvern Madondo

    Junior
    Harare, Zimbabwe
    Mathematics & Computer Science

    Patrick Linn

    Class of 2017
    Roseville, MN
    Communication Major, Film Concentration

    Neena Koslowski

    Junior
    Apple Valley, MN
    Management

    Morgan Richie

    Class of 2017
    Hudson, WI
    Biology and Spanish

  • Jin Baek

    Senior
    Aurora, CO
    Biology and Chemistry (Pre-Med)

    Halle Nystrom

    Graduate Student
    Fargo, ND
    M.S. Health Information Management

    Semaj Moore

    Class of 2017
    Minneapolis, MN
    English, Medieval & Renaissance

5 Myths about College

You hear a lot about college. These things influence how you think about college. Regardless if you decide to attend a private or public, big or small, near or far college these five myths are sure to come up.

The 4 Year Promise

There is this expectation that you will get a degree after 4 years (8 semesters) of college courses. It isn’t just a goal, but often times comes as an expectation. I know this may be hard news, but a lot of us college students end up being “super seniors”. We regularly spend an extra semester or year taking courses.
This not bad news. You get to take more fun classes if you want. This extra time also allows you to spend more time participating in your favorite extra curricular activities.
I am taking an extra year, a semester of classes and a semester of student teaching. Quite a few education majors elect to take an extra semester or year. It really helps give us time to get our licensing exams lined up and participate in the things we love at college.
There Isn’t Help Paying for College
This one is so false it hurts! There are tons of places you can go to apply for scholarships and grants. Check with your potential schools to see their scholarship directory. These will help you bring in the big bucks to help cover college costs.
Liberal Arts Majors Don’t Get Hired

You’ve heard it a million times, the starving artist rumor. Guess what, humanities majors aren’t doing that badly in the job market. According to this article by The Atlantic, employment statistics show that the humanities (and the arts) students are getting hired.
Go to College Now or Never
It is an expectation that you should apply to college during your senior year of high school. Would it be a surprise if I told you college have a lot of non-traditional students? Students that are taking college courses a few years down the line (or maybe quite a few years) from high school are very common. It is never too late to apply to college!
You Need to Know Your Major

When I started college I was a mathematics major. I am now a double major in History and Social Sciences. Why? I was given the option to declare my major when I applied. I was intending on becoming a math teacher. I like math, why not put that on my application. However, many students enter college either undeclared or will change their major within the first 2 years. It’s a time to find what you are passionate about, what you want to learn about and do the rest of your life. It isn’t going to be an easy decision, but being undeclared or changing your major is totally normal and perfectly okay!

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